SAVE THE DATE: AIA Home Tour

If you love great architecture, the 13th annual  AIA Architecture Tour is a spring must see. Save the date for Saturday, April 12, 2014 from Noon – 5:00 p.m. for the self-guided tour presented by the AIA Central Oklahoma Chapter. See what our talented local architects have been working on in this spectacular showcase.

From AIA:

The 2014 AIA Architecture Tour locations include:

35

Walters Home (located at 6219 Riveria Drive) is owned by David and Rhonda Walters. The renovation architect for the project was James Loftis Architects. When former Oklahoma Governor David and Rhonda Walters left the Governor’s Mansion in 1995, it was no small task to find a home with the space and warmth that they had become accustomed to during his term in office. And, if you know the Walters, you know that they are about being together with family and friends. So, it was a natural fit when they decided to purchase the 7,800-square-foot Oklahoma City home of their close friend and deep gas pioneer, Robert Hefner, III. Built in 1963 and located at 6210 Riviera Drive in Oklahoma City, the home was christened with its double entendre name, “The Villa on Riviera” by Hefner and designed around an interior courtyard with a swimming pool. After an April 2001 fire in their home caused over $200,000 in damage, Walters enlisted the help of architect James Loftis, FAIA, to assist with repairs and restoration of the home. The Walter’s residence is organized around a spacious courtyard which features a large swimming pool. The house surrounds this area on three sides with floor to ceiling glass. An outdoor fireplace is featured under a wood trellis at the east end of the courtyard. A second level outdoor terrace connects to the courtyard with a circular stair. One enters the residence through a two story entry, which flows to a large formal living area and several of the 27 skylights. A private spacious master bedroom and office terminate the west end of the house, along with the secluded master bath facing an enclosed private courtyard. A 16th Century circular wood stair connects a serving bar with the basement wine cellar. Several renovations have produced a spacious island gourmet kitchen and formal dining room, with a see-through fireplace on the east end of the residence. Several large triangular skylights provide striking natural light to the social areas.

Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography
Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography

430 (located at 430 NW 12th Street)is owned by Midtown Renaissance Group and the architect is Fitzsimmons Architects. The building at 430 NW 12th started life as a non-descript two-story office building. Originally constructed in 1955, the building had been vacant for several years, allowing the exterior to slowly fall into a state of disrepair. Although the exterior was deemed irreparable, the bones of the building were in good condition. The structure consisted of board-formed two-way flat plate slabs supported on concrete columns. The determination was made that the building would be reborn as apartments in the burgeoning Midtown District. Aware of the need to maximize the building’s potential for the developers, the Architect suggested adding a third floor to increase the amount of usable square footage. This third floor also allowed the creation of large two-story units with upper floors offering expansive decks and unparalleled views of downtown Oklahoma City. This decision increased the available area by 57%, from the original 14,160 SF to 22,336 SF.

Photo credit: Ike Harper
Photo credit: Ike Harper

Calvary Baptist Church (located at 300 North Walker) – by Joy and Dan Davis and the architect of the project is MODA. Calvary Baptist Church was deemed a Historic Landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978, based on both its architectural and cultural significance. The building played a pivotal role in the civil rights movement in Oklahoma City and was the location of the NAACP convention, as well as hosting Martin Luther King in the pulpit. Joy and Dan Davis, of Dan Davis Law, purchased the property in 2012 with a desire to renovate and restore the building as a new office for their firm. The goal and concept of the project were clear: design the space so that the renovation would support both the rich history of the church and its new function as a law office. The basement of the church now serves as the reception area, with a new entry plaza designed to reflect the modern architecture in the surrounding area, allowing the grand front façade to remain unchanged. Many of the functional spaces are housed in the basement, maximizing the grand views in the sanctuary levels. Private offices are located on the first and second levels overlooking the main sanctuary. A frameless glass wall system was used, allowing users to have a full experience of the interior views and stained glass windows. The client opted to preserve the center sanctuary of the church, offering it to the local community for special events.

Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography
Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography

Guardian Lofts (located at 1117 N. Robinson Avenue) – owned by Midtown Renaissance Group. The architect for the project is Fitzsimmons Architects. As part of a three-phase program in the Midtown District of downtown Oklahoma City, the 90-year-old, 40,000 square foot historic Guardian Building warehouse was a renovation and adaptive reuse project. It provides thirty-seven apartments and a ground level restaurant with shared entries onto the adjacent public plaza that was converted from a former rundown alley. The units provide tenants with true, industrial loft-style living and flexible floor plans. Movable closets and flip-top islands are amenities providing tenants opportunities to customize the space. The original building design itself is unique, with large casement windows fully restored with insulated glass providing some of the most expansive views available of downtown Oklahoma City. The exterior features of gothic /art deco hybrid detailing was used as inspiration for the expanded metal panels’ stepped configuration within the stairwells and common spaces. The new entry to the building itself is also unusual, with an inset Zen garden courtyard placed within the alley plaza on the side. This leads to a new internal grand metal stair filled with light borrowed from the skylight above and glass walls separating the restaurant space from the tenant space. This shared glass wall allows for visual interaction between the tenant commons and the commercial restaurant.

 

Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography
Photo credit: Joseph Mills Photography

Kliewer Home (located at 2801 NE 120th Street) The Restoration of an Icon” refers to both the status of the residence as an AIA Award winning design in 1970 as well as the status of the original designer and inhabitant, George Seminoff, Architect. This house was originally built as a “weekend bachelor pad” retreat from the hectic downtown life of the architect. Mr. Seminoff, inspired by Mies van der Rohe, built a 20’ by 40’ house of one glass and three brick walls overlooking a stunning, blue-tiled swimming pool. The surrounding landscape was left largely in a natural state. Exterior materials were selected to compliment the original palette of brick masonry; cedar siding on the lower level and cedar shake shingles on the upper level. The siding and shingles of the two story volume were deteriorated beyond salvage resulting in extensive water damage to much of the structure. Reframing was required along with new sheathing, waterproofing membrane and exterior cladding. Redwood siding was chosen for the lower level as a nod to the original cedar and Cor-ten steel panels were chosen for the upper levels. The Cor-ten “shingles” were installed over metal furring strips creating a rain-screen wall surface. Interior finishes were selected to compliment the original color palette of the interior and exterior and to provide a warm, inviting space in which to live and entertain. Finishes include painted drywall, bamboo flooring, new teak flooring, and painted millwork with soapstone counters. The interior concept was intended to highlight and honor both the basic principles of modern design implemented by the original architect and to provide a fresh and exciting space to live, work and entertain. The home is owned by Brent Kliewer and Fitzsimmons Architects is the restoration architect. As the space became complete, the owner, working with local designer Larry Pickering, chose to complement the interior with custom furniture, art and accessories chosen to highlight both the original concept as well as the new finishes.

Photo credit: Small Architects
Photo credit: Small Architects

Small Architects (located at 108 S. Broadway in Edmond) is owned by Thomas Small, AIA.The architect of the project is Small Architects. Small Architects is a full service architecture and interior design firm located in downtown Edmond in one of their own historical rehabilitation projects. Built in 1906, the old stone building known as 108 S. Broadway in downtown Edmond originally served the new, booming Edmond settlement as a jewelry store on the first floor and a funeral parlor on the second floor. The building has since served many purposes in its lifetime. Small Architects purchased the building in 2011 and began a total rehabilitation. The company completed the project in the Spring of 2013. With the exterior restored similar to its original facade, the space now boasts a large architectural studio space for professional staff upstairs. Reception, administrative offices and a 14 seat conference room occupies the ground floor. The project is a great example of Small Architects talent and capabilities. The space honors the past by preserving traditional materials throughout the building contrasted with new, modern features that allow the professional staff access to professional facilities, equipment and connectivity.

(Mass Photo coming soon.)

Mass Home (located 1721 NE 63rd Street) is owned by Duane and Robin Mass and was designed by Mass Architects, Inc. When a family resolved after a decade on a farm to relocate in, they were accustomed to a level of personal space hard to realize in city limits. This estate reaches back to the 1920’s when this area “Persimmon Hill” was the far eastern edge of our City surrounded by a large dairy farm and full of personal space. The 5 acres contained a small residence built in the 1920’s which provided the perfect starting point for a family wanting the same large rambling farm home they had known. Through a series of additions on all sides and upward, the home then accommodated a large family taking a modest frame cottage to a family home. A more traditional floor plan with a families familiar rural aesthetic was the goal. The exterior materials were a favorite of the architect when in years past designing in Texas, the silver roofs and regional limestone both contributing to energy efficiency and durability. The original siting of the cottage was woven into the new home set upon a small ridge facing the south and hidden for years until a severe ice storm in 2007. The family feelings on the project was that nothing was “greener” than to keep the modest cottage out of a landfill and make it a part of the new family home. The interior was crafted to reflect the families desire for the more traditional details of homebuilding aligned with an interior color palette focused on warmth and reminiscent of harvest color. The home is filled with light and large windows focus on the beautiful park like setting the home enjoys in the city.

Photo credit:  Tim Hutsley
Photo credit: Tim Hutsley

The Hart Building (located at 726 West Sheridan) is owned by Hart Partners and was designed by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris LLC. Hart Building is an adaptive reuse project on the historic Film Row near downtown Oklahoma City. The existing building fabric of a collection of warehouse buildings – the former home of the Hart Industrial Supply Company – is restored and combined with new elements to create a truly mixed-use workplace. Flipping the building’s front from the north to the south reorients the original entrance sequence to connect to the new landscaped parking lot and engage an old, forgotten alleyway. The new layout accommodates a pinwheel of activity arranged around an internal street that is both circulation and social core with public spaces and shared amenities coming off it. The building includes 40,000 square feet of Class A office space, of which the architect’s own OKC HQ is a part. A new double-height, glazed atrium brings light deep into the center of the plan, while an inserted bridge simplifies upper level circulation, and, in so doing, creates both spectacle and opportunities for chance encounter. The building is one of the largest privately developed ground source heating and cooling installations in OKC.

TICKET INFO

Tickets for this year’s tour will go on sale March 31st and can be purchased online at www.aiacoc.org/tour or at one of our ticket outlets: TAPARCHITECTURE in downtown Oklahoma City at 415 N. Broadway or at the AIA Central Oklahoma office located at 3535 N. Classen Boulevard in Oklahoma City. Advance tickets will be on sale through April 10th, after this date tickets will have to be purchased the day of the tour at one of the tour locations. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 the day of the tour.

AIA would like to thank this year’s tour supporters: Smith Lighting Sales, Timberlake Construction, JE Dunn Construction, Design Resources, Nabholz Construction, Crossville Tile & Stone, Flintco Constructive Solutions, MA+ Architecture, Mass Architects, Randy Floyd Architects, Small Architects, Southern Design Group, Trumble Dean LLC, and Wallace Engineering.

AIA Central Oklahoma is a 450-member professional organization committed to serving the community and the profession by promoting excellence in, and public awareness of, the built environment through quality architecture.

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